11/18/10 PART 3

Our original male sugar Ball Python had almost NO white at all and when I say no white I mean like I was "how can these 5 white spots mean anything!" The son we started with from that original male is in our book-on page 168, and he has good white! His offspring combined with pastels have been fabulous! This is a good example of working with any mutation "the genotype is in there despite the outward phenotype." If you don't get that "pick" animal you want because someone else got it, then the next one all the way down the line can still produce the best babies! People ask me many times how come I offer that they pick which animals they want and that I am happy to keep the animals that are "left over." My point is that those animals are still genetically capable of producing awesome babies! Of course if there is something about the phenotype that belies some variation that can also be genetic that the siblings don't appear to have, that is a different story-but more often than not it is not the case. The point is that if I did not get the original male that had only a few white spots, because he wasn't a "good example" of the mutation-that would have been a mistake! Most times we have a range of options to get the look we love-but sometimes we don't and I personally don't let that get in the way of starting to work on a project.

VPI PASTEL SUGAR 2009 DESCENDED FROM ORIGINAL MALE THAT ESSENTIALLY HAD NO WHITE ON IT!VPI PASTEL SUGAR 2009 DESCENDED FROM ORIGINAL MALE THAT ESSENTIALLY HAD NO WHITE ON IT!