O4/26/11

MOTLEY X VPI CARAMEL ALBINO LITTER BORN 04/26/11MOTLEY X VPI CARAMEL ALBINO LITTER BORN 04/26/11Today was a little crazy! Of course I had my usual million things to do-and as the day progressed got absolutely none of them done due to unforseen circumstances. First I was getting ready to take photos-and the electricity went out. This of course meant that I couldn't see the subjects I was photographing! I had eggs to put away, but didn't want to open the incubator door to let any heat escape not knowing how long the electricity would be out. During this period I got a call from Chris Nicholas and of course the topic was Boas! He was telling me about his babies and I was telling him about a female I was waiting for to have her babies. It was a Motley female I bred to the unrelated Caramel Albino male. I was excited about this litter because the female was 5 years old and this was the first time I had gotten everything together and was able to get a very important litter from her. I had her sister who had produced babies, and finally it was this girl. I told Chris I thought I had about 2 weeks until she was due so I was pretty nervous and excited about it. I am all about making the Motley t, and wanted to be able have a great base of unrelated animals to breed into the VPI Caramel Albino line animals I have been raising.

FEMALE MOTLEY X MALE CARAMEL ALBINO LITTER BORN 04/16/11FEMALE MOTLEY X MALE CARAMEL ALBINO LITTER BORN 04/16/11

After we finished talking and I hung up the phone I thought I might check on the female just to see how she was doing. Wow, that was lucky as I found a pile of babies that was about two weeks earlier than I had expected!

MOTLEY FEMALE X CARAMEL ALBINO MALE LITTER BORN 04/26/11MOTLEY FEMALE X CARAMEL ALBINO MALE LITTER BORN 04/26/11

The Motley 100% het Caramel Albinos look great and I look forward to really progressing on the Caramel Albino Motley project. In my mind you can't have too many male Boas. I only use one male boa for each female. Each male only sees one female at a time and is never introduced to another female until the female before has completed ovulation. This minimizes any stress on a breeding animal. I attribute a lot of our success with Boas to going with the old addage: "slow and stready wins the race."